Post Grad Survival Guide — Change Your Resume and Land An Interview

Time for some practical career advice.

This past Sunday, my friend and I went to a bustling Barnes & Noble (it was so PACKED) to plan our upcoming trip to New York. This hang quickly turned into a free resume writing lesson. She had so many things wrong with her resume that we stopped our trip planning to completely rewrite it.

The following tips are most applicable if you graduated college within the last 3 years.

1. List your education first

At this stage in your professional career, your Bachelor’s/Master’s/Doctoral/What-have-you degree is likely your most important and relevant accomplishment.

  • DO NOT list your high school (or middle school or elementary school). A college degree implies the completion of high school; this redundancy isn’t necessary nor relevant.
  • DO NOT include your GPA unless it’s stellar, meaning higher than a 3.5. Even then, I don’t suggest you write it unless the position requires an undergrad GPA greater than “X” number.
  • List your education in reverse chronology. For example, if you have a Bachelor’s, a Master’s, and a Doctoral degree, list the Doctoral first, then your Master’s, then your Bachelor’s.

2. List your Experience second

If you think you don’t have any experience, you may be wrong. Here, you can list occupations you have had with no pay like Tutor, Research Assistant, Research Intern, Intern, Writer (for the school paper), Radio host (for the school’s radio station). Think of all the experiences you have to offer and list them, and if you don’t have any to list, apply anyway! Employers know that you are just starting out in your career.

  • DO NOT describe your experience in a personal way. This means don’t say things like, “I loved this job because I really grew as a person, not only professionally but personally as well.” This is not professional. Look at the description of the position you held or google the description (e.g. search ‘research assistant job description’) for ideas on what to write and how to write it.
  • DO NOT list your responsibilities as bullet points.

3. List “Outreach” or “Volunteer Experience” third

Employers love community outreach; volunteering serves to make you a more well-rounded person. List this the same way you would list a job.  If you don’t have anything to list here, get to volunteering! Go to an animal shelter or rescue mission to see what you can do for your community.

4. List Scholarships fourth 

List them in bullets, along with the years you had them. An explanation isn’t necessary. You don’t want your resume to become a drag to read. Here’s an example how what it should look like:

  • Libbie H. Hyman Memorial Scholarship (2012-2016)
  • First Generation Scholarship (2012-2016)

DO NOT list financial aid as a scholarship award.

5. List “Conference Presentations” or “Publications” fifth

Maybe you presented at an undergraduate research conference or you were included as a coauthor on a professor’s publication (if you worked in their lab or research center) or you wrote articles for your school paper/magazine. List these accomplishments.

6. Certifications

List only relevant certifications. If you earned a certificate in bartending, that’s something you would only list if you were going into Hospitality or the Food & Beverage Industry.

7. Extracurricular Activities

Were you a part of any club or organization at your university? List them in bullets along with the years you were active. For example:

  • Phi Alpha Delta (2014-2016)
  • Alternative Breaks (2012-2016)
  • Student Council  (2012-2013)

8. Languages 

You should only have this section if you speak more than one language. List the language along with your level of proficiency. It should look like this:

English (native), Spanish (native), German (Intermediate)

DO NOT list a language you can’t even speak a full sentence in. If you speak a language at an elementary level, you should probably leave it out.

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If there are headings in this outline in which you don’t have anything to list or mention, like Conference Presentations or Certifications, DO NOT list the heading. Skip it and move on to the next heading.


Do you have any tips on resume writing? Leave them in the comments! It could help someone! Thanks for reading.

How to get clear skin and keep it that way

I had terrible acne growing up. After years of trying different products and health habits, these are my tips for getting rid of acne, based on what worked for me.

Change your diet.

Drink water, cut out dairy, and eat foods rich in anti-oxidants.

  • Water will keep your skin hydrated and help your body flush out toxins that may contribute to acne.
  • Dairy (milk, cheese, ice cream, yogurt, etc.) increases sebum production in the skin leading to clogged pores, which leads to more acne. Cutting out dairy will drive a huge turnaround for your skin.
  • Consuming more antioxidants may reduce skin inflammation which could reduce your acne (Inflammation leads to more acne, antioxidants reduce inflammation). Antioxidants also help keep your skin looking youthful and vibrant.

Change your skincare products.

These are the products that worked for me.

If buying from cruelty-free and vegan brands is something you care about, check out these links:

Don’t know if it’s vegan? Double check the ingredients here.

Don’t know if they test on animals? Check here or here.

Workout.

Working out (and drinking water) increases the blood flow to your skin which helps bring more oxygen to your skin cells which helps excrete cell waste from your skin, leading to clearer skin.

Keep your makeup light and don’t ever wear it to sleep. 

Also, try going a few days without makeup during the week. Letting you skin breathe will unclog your pores and increase oxygen circulation to your skin.

 

Do you have any skincare tips? What’s worked for you and what hasn’t?

Four Stars & Up: Monthly Favorites

Book: KAHLO by Andrea Kettenmann

This is a short biographical book that chronicles Frida Kahlo’s life, ideologies, and relationships by describing her paintings. Although she lived a tragic life, she had tremendous Mexican pride and a sweet relationship with her father (who was a great mentor to her as an artist). You can read this book in one sitting or you can you can read 3-4 pages a day for a month to finish it. This is such an enjoyable book that I recommend extending your reading experience of it as much as possible.

My subjects have always been my sensations, my states of mind and the profound reactions that life has been producing in me.
-Frida Kahlo

TV Show: The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story, directed by Ryan Murphy, Anthony Hemingway, and John Singleton and based on the non-fiction book The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson by Jeffrey Toobin

This show tells the story of the “trial of the century” and has been praised for the spectacular job the directors, writers, and actors did with conveying the courtroom atmosphere, political climate, and facts surrounding this case. I watched several post-trial interviews about this case after watching this show and I continue to be fascinated with what happened during this trial. I’m thinking about reading Marcia Clark’s book Without a Doubt and If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer by Pablo Fenjves & (purportedly) O.J. Simpson.

Movie: Get Out, written and directed by Jordan Peele

This movie received a 99% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Jordan Peele has said that Get Out was an idea in the making since Obama was elected President in 2008. This movie is so thought-provoking and debuts with perfect timing as it parallels (sadly) rising racial tensions in the U.S. Get Out is definitely a must-see.

Recipe: Coconut & Lemon Zest Vegan Donuts by ConnoisseurusVeg

Best.donuts.ever.Even my sister’s non-vegan (borderline anti-vegan) fiancé loved these. I had to add about an extra 1.5 cups of powdered sugar to the icing to get it to my desired consistency.

ExperienceRussian National Ballet Theatre: Swan Lake

I saw this at the Parker Playhouse Theatre in Fort Lauderdale. It was such a good time! I hadn’t been to a ballet since I was 14. I’d like to see a flamenco-themed ballet next.

Learning More About People Through Conversation

Here are some things to pay attention to in your conversations with other people. You may learn more about them than you otherwise would!

Statements and Generalizations. Pay attention to the things people say. If someone says a generalization about a group of people, that could say more about the person saying it than the group they are claiming to generalize. For example, one of my friends recently said, “people never behave how they feel, they only say how they feel and behave how they think,” which told me more about him than it did about humanity. Sometimes when people aren’t trying to talk about themselves, they end up telling you a lot about who they are.

Overreactions. If you’re discussing something with somebody and they start yelling or become angry, seemingly out of nowhere, their frustration probably has nothing to do with what you said about the topic you were discussing. As soon as there is a reaction unmerited by the situation, the conversation/argument is no longer about the subject you engaged in but in the person’s need to blow off steam regarding a separate situation they’re unhappy about. Sometimes people lash out in situations unrelated to whatever it is they’re unhappy about to unburden any anguish/stress they feel about that outside problem they’re dealing (or failing to deal) with.

Insults. Whenever a conversation, argument, or discussion resorts to insults, not only is it time to walk away, but it says a lot about the person doing the insulting. If you notice that somebody is becoming disrespectful in a conversation, it could mean that they feel belittled or beaten by the dialogue and are aiming to “win” through insult by trying to verbally hurt the other person as much as possible. It’s pointless to continue engaging with someone who’s enraged and in their anger, are unable to concede that they are either wrong or that they can’t/don’t want to continue defending their position.  Insults are often just used as a defense mechanism, even if the situation makes them seem unnecessary to you; if you pay attention to what and how a person is choosing to insult you, it could tell you a lot about how the person is feeling about themselves and what they’re insecure about.

How I Dealt With A Boss From Hell

In January of last year, I took a job that taught me a lot about interpersonal relationships, office politics, and how to deal with an alcoholic for a boss.

Within the first week at this company, my boss was already bad-mouthing employees in front of me, asking me (at noon) if I wanted to join him for a shot of whiskey, and speaking disparaging things about women, arabs, and black people in casual conversation (he believes racial/ethnic slurs are only politically incorrect). Within a couple of months, he was bad-mouthing me to the CEO’s daughter, inviting my interns to the bar after work, and aggressively endorsing Trump at company events. I’d had other bosses before so I knew what it meant to be professional. This guy was a real piece of work.

Luckily, this person was only the boss I directly reported to, so there was a hierarchy above him that I could approach concerning his behavior. Here are some tips on how to deal with a boss like this.

  1. Take them to lunch. Why would you want to take someone like this out to lunch? If they’re behaving this way, it could just be that there’s something going on in their personal lives. Try to create a respectful work relationship (since they couldn’t) and show them that you’re on their side. This may not work but it’s worth a try.
  2. Keep record. If your boss tells you to change something on an assignment or do something other than what you should be working on, ask them to send you an email request. If they deny the email request, notify your boss, your team, and relevant higher ups via email that you’ll momentarily be working on a different assignment or changing the project at hand. If your boss’s decision ends up being questioned by their boss, they won’t be able to blame it on you (I learned this the hard way).
  3. Set boundaries. If they start talking about subjects that are unprofessional or make you uncomfortable, politely redirect the conversation. If they continue circling back to these topics, tell them you don’t like discussing those topics at work.
  4. Don’t drink with them. It took me a month to figure out my boss was an alcoholic. Before this, I’d joined him and the team out for drinks after work a few times to get to know them. While it’s definitely okay to grab drinks with coworkers every once in a while, my boss did this at least twice a week in addition to his showing up to work hungover and drinking on the job. If you notice that your boss is a alcoholic, don’t participate in drinking behaviors with them. If they ask you to go for drinks, ask them for coffee or tea instead.
  5. Address the problem. Chances are, the both of you know there’s tension between you. Schedule a meeting with your boss and HR to talk about it. If things don’t improve or if they worsen (as it worsened in my case), schedule a meeting with your boss’s boss (or a relevant authority to whom you both report to/hold meetings with). Do not invite the boss who is giving you trouble to this meeting. I had this meeting with my boss’s boss (he was always in our team meetings and we already had a professional and friendly relationship). While the meeting didn’t help to improve my direct boss’s behavior, it did change who my direct boss was. I no longer had to report to the disrespectful boss because his boss changed the office hierarchy so that we both had to report to him.

As you can imagine, this change really bothered my now former boss. He became more erratic and drank even more. The situation at the company wasn’t really changing so I began looking for a job that allowed me to work remotely until I started medical/law school (I had taken this managing position after graduating university and was using it to fill time while I decided between medical school and law school). I’ll be starting law school in the fall and am very grateful for the time I spent at that company. I learned a lot about how to deal with people (terrible bosses in particular) and I know that it will be invaluable to me in the future.